In Function

Description: The IN function helps reduce the need to use multiple OR conditions.

-- The syntax for the IN function is:
 
SELECT columns
FROM tables
WHERE column1 IN (value1, value2, .... value_n);
 
-- This SQL statement will return the records where column1 is
-- value1, value2..., or value_n. The IN function can be used
-- in any valid SQL statement - select, insert, update, or delete.
 
 
 
-- Example #1
 
-- The following is an SQL statement that uses the IN function:
 
SELECT *
FROM suppliers
WHERE supplier_name IN ( 'IBM', 'Hewlett Packard', 'Microsoft');
 
-- This would return all rows where the supplier_name is either
-- IBM, Hewlett Packard, or Microsoft. Because the * is used in
-- the select, all fields from the suppliers table would appear
-- in the result set.
 
-- It is equivalent to the following statement:
 
SELECT *
FROM suppliers
WHERE supplier_name = 'IBM'
OR supplier_name = 'Hewlett Packard'
OR supplier_name = 'Microsoft';
 
-- As you can see, using the IN function makes the statement
-- easier to read and more efficient.
 
 
 
-- Example #2
 
-- You can also use the IN function with numeric values.
 
SELECT *
FROM orders
WHERE order_id IN (10000, 10001, 10003, 10005);
 
-- This SQL statement would return all orders where the order_id
-- is either 10000, 10001, 10003, or 10005.
 
-- It is equivalent to the following statement:
 
SELECT *
FROM orders
WHERE order_id = 10000
OR order_id = 10001
OR order_id = 10003
OR order_id = 10005;
 
 
 
-- Example #3 using "NOT IN"
 
-- The IN function can also be combined with the NOT operator.
 
-- For w3mentor,
 
SELECT *
FROM suppliers
WHERE supplier_name NOT IN ( 'IBM', 'Hewlett Packard',
'Microsoft');
 
-- This would return all rows where the supplier_name is neither
-- IBM, Hewlett Packard, or Microsoft. Sometimes, it is more
-- efficient to list the values that you do not want, as opposed
-- to the values that you do want.

Enjoyed this post? Share it!

 

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.